Search

Ketamine Therapy - A Positive Reinforcement for Suicidal Patients


Suicidal thoughts were reduced in those suffering from chronic suicidality after using low-dose oral ketamine, a recent study from the USC Thompson Institute in Australia says. While several studies have looked at the effects of using ketamine intravenously to treat a variety of mental illnesses, this may be the first to look into the possibility of taking ketamine orally, which may be less costly and more convenient to administer.



Two-thirds of the participants in this 6-week open-label trial of oral ketamine treatment demonstrated substantial progress, indicating a significant reduction in suicidal thoughts. Within the first six weeks, 69% of the participants improved clinically,

while 50% improved significantly after the treatment. Oral ketamine was found to be well tolerated with only minor and temporary side effects experienced immediately following treatment, all of which subsided by the time the participants were discharged. Comparing the findings of this study to those of ketamine IV trials, it appears that oral administration is a viable and tolerable alternative to IV ketamine in treating chronic suicidality.



It is important to note that while oral ketamine may be an effective solution, it does not have the same immediate effect if administered intravenously. While previous studies have shown that suicidality can be decreased within a few hours following ketamine infusion, the oral ketamine trial indicates that the reaction can take weeks rather than just a day.



What impact do you believe this new development would have on patient access? I’d love to hear your thoughts, so leave them in the comment section below. Also, If you’re interested in learning how to start your own ketamine practice, you can attend this free masterclass.